COFFEE-ROCK-THOUGHT

don't take this personally, but...

Friday, March 28

I love the Baratza Forte! (a cheerful, not-too-technical review)

(A disclaimer, this is not intended to be a tech-heavy review / breakdown of the grinder. Other folks have already done an awesome job of that and you should check out their reviews. Here’s looking at you, Prima Coffee!)

You know, sometimes there’s a coffee tool that you work with and it’s fine, and it gets the job done.

Maybe you’re still pushing that Mr. Coffee glass pot brewer that you bought in college for your dorm room down the road. Maybe you have a coffee grinder that was gifted you by a relative who got a good deal on it at Macy’s. They help you make the coffee and they are fine. 

Then you catch the coffee bug and you start to question these tools and their abilities. You could say it’s like this with anything…you enjoy riding your bicycle but then you meet some folks and they let you try out their bike which happens to ride a little smoother, faster, and lighter. Maybe you enter a race. Maybe you enter a couple of races and before you know it that old bike ain’t cutting it anymore and it’s time to upgrade. It’s more about following the pursuit of something better and more efficient and smart than keeping up with your friends (though that helps in the buying decision as well, lets be honest!)

I’ve had a number of coffee grinders over the years and they’ve all done a fine enough job for me at my humble house in the mornings and no doubt I’ve brewed some tasty cups at home. But they never quite matched the quality of grind, speed, and consistency of the best grinders that I would have access to at my job at the coffee roastery. I’m fortunate enough to be able to test and use a variety of different commercial grinders that do a wonderful job of grinding coffee so you can imagine my frequent frustration that I would experience at home when my home grinder just wouldn’t do the same job that the big guy at work would do. 

Enter Baratza… 

My first better quality home grinder was the Maestro by Baratza. This is their entry level grinder that I still recommend to everyone I know who is looking to up their coffee game at home. After a number of years using the Maestro and being quite satisfied with the results I had the chance to try out some of their other models. I won a couple coffee brewing competitions and won some other really nice grinders from Baratza along the way. These grinders are truly great, especially for home use where smaller batches and infrequent brewing take place. They have really nice burr sets, decent speeds, and fairly nice quality of size distribution. But I’ve been hesitant for folks to use them in a high-volume application in fear that these models would hold up to the abuse.

About a year ago Baratza introduced a new model after listening to customer feedback and desire for a more robust and heavy duty grinder that would be suitable for commercial use either in restaurants or coffee shops. This grinder is called the Forte and they have hit the nail on the head. 

Main things that jumped out to me right off the bat and gave me confidence in its ability for commercial applications- 

The weight of the grinder itself - this thing is heavy! This is a good thing since a busy place requires your equipment to not dance across the counter and be noisy while grinding.

The digital interface and super great accuracy of the built-in scale. - This is super easy to use, crazy accurate (about .3g +/-), and looks good to boot!  

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Also, the grind adjustment sliders - HUGE improvement over those found on the Vario. These are all metal, and easier to click into place. BTW - that setting shown in the picture is the first setting I randomly chose out of the box and have only moved the left, micro-adjustment switch up and down and few places. 

To that point, I felt on previous grinders that my brews were inconsistent from cup to cup and despite trying a lot of tactics to eliminate that, I kept coming back to inconsistencies in the grind for some reason. Not a problem at all on this grinder. It’s like I’m working with the grinders that at 3x the price and size. 

Here’s a pic of a recent grind sample - 

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My job title is Wholesale Sales Rep. Part of what I do is to help folks make the right decision in coffee equipment for their cafes and restaurants. Though I’ve not really pushed this thing through the paces of a high volume place, I really have no doubt that it would do a great job. I’ve brewed multiple cups in a row for a few different get togethers and I can tell you without a doubt that this is absolutely a commercial-quality grinder all the way through and it does an amazing job. 

Thanks Baratza team for allowing me to get to know this great grinder, you’ve really outdone yourselves this time!!

Wednesday, April 10

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pitchfork:

Read Jayson Greene’s review of Kurt Vile’s latest album, Wakin on a Pretty Daze, our latest Best New Music pick.

Wednesday, April 3

  • 48 notes
  • 1 note

2013 US Brewers Cup: The Road to Boston and #TeamHaru, Part 1

Hello there!
It’s been forever since I wrote a nice lengthy blog post about coffee and I think it’s high time I get to it. The next series of posts will be about my journey to the Brewers Cup and I’m attempting to gear these posts more towards friends and family who might not have extensive knowledge about coffee and/or what the heck this competition is that I’m about to throw myself into!

This time next Wednesday I’ll be on a flight to Boston where I’ll be representing the company I work for, Counter Culture Coffee, at the US national Brewers Cup Championship. I couldn’t be more excited and nervous, but the one thing that keeps me focused is, of course, the coffee itself. 

Here in the US baseball season has started back up and I can’t help but see some similarities. Baseball is “America’s Favorite Pastime” and coffee, it could be argued, is America’s favorite beverage….well it’s my favorite anyway! But the better analogy I see here is the building of a team that works together, appreciates each other, and strives to help their teammates to succeed. The coffee I’ve used for the past two competitions has been the same: a delicious and delicate coffee from the Haru Cooperative in Southwest Ethiopia. This will be the coffee I take with me to Boston and it’s “Team Haru” who have brought us this far. 

For fun, let’s think of these amazing people and equipment as an all star baseball team. (Some of these might be a stretch, but just have some fun with me here!)

The Bench Coach - 

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(Photo credit, Tim Hill - http://www.flickr.com/photos/counterculturecoffee/6392318557/)

This is the washing station manager of Haru, and with him we worked out a plan to produce some the best coffee possible from this washing station. The coffee I’ve been presenting is Haru and is what we are calling the “Grade 1” lot. We (Tim and the coffee buying team at CCC) committed to buying coffee at a high premium that 1) will be picked absolutely ripe, 2) comes from about 20-30% of the farmers that have great altitude and bring better cherry, and 3) will be sorted out to zero defects. 

A great team usually has a solid coaching staff behind it and the “Bench Coach” in baseball is one of the most important coaches in the game. He reports directly to the Manager to report on how the game is going and offers insight to the manager to help him make the right decisions. The manager of Haru is responsible for this meticulous attention to detail and without his direct communication and input, you most likely would not know about this coffee!

 

The GM —

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(Photo credit Tim Hill - http://www.flickr.com/photos/counterculturecoffee/6391559443/)

This is Takele Mammo. Takele is the general manager of the YCFCU (Yirgacheffee Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union). YCFCU is the umbrella organization that helps manage all of the washing stations we currently work with in Ethiopia, including Haru. YCFCU also is the organization responsible for exporting the coffee to us as well. 

Like a great ball team manager, his passion and care for his team is evident from the first time you meet him. (I had the chance to meet him earlier this year when he visited Counter Culture Coffee in NC!). He knows what it takes, believes in his players, and is willing to put in the hard work beside them to get them to the pennant. 

 

Welcome to Louisville - 

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(Photo credit Tim Hill)

There are so many great pictures to show you that Tim has taken during his visits to Haru, so allow me a few more that really hit home for me. What you see above is a representation of the “processing” of the coffee. One of the fun things you learn about coffee when you first get into it is that the beans are actually seeds that grow inside of a fruit. How people go about removing the skin and meat of that fruit from the seed has a huge effect on how the coffee will perform and what flavors from that fruit are enhanced or captured. So let’s go through the steps—

The first picture is someone picking the coffee cherry (only when it’s ripe!) from the coffee shrub. A couple of important things to note here that I learned from Tim… the trees on most of the farms that Tim saw in Haru are of mostly the same variety. He would later find out that there are actually three dominant varieties growing in that region and this is a pretty cool thing and helps us understand better what is building those “classic Yirgacheffe” flavors that we love…you know, that sweet lemon and sugary tea-like snap?  The thing I love most about the brews of Haru that I’m preparing is that the flavors that show up remind me mostly of cascara, or coffee cherry tea. I’m literally tasting the cherry in the brewed coffee and IT IS AWESOME! It seriously makes me giddy every time I taste it!

The next picture is one that Tim took of his hand full of coffee that he pulled from the underwater fermentation tank. Once the skin of the coffee cherry is removed, the beans are covered in mucilage. How do you get that off? Well there are a number of way but the most common in this area  is to soak the coffee underwater and let the enzymes in the water break the mucilage down naturally. What sets Haru apart is that this is done twice and both fermentations take place anywhere from 36 to 48 hours. That’s a long soak!

Then you see some fellows with rakes standing over a trough full of water and coffee. This is part of the washing process. There are different ways of sorting the coffee and helping to remove any leftover skins and the most efficient, typically, is to let gravity do it’s job…the most dense coffee sinks, the lighter stuff floats.

Next are the drying beds for the coffee after it’s been properly fermented and washed. The 360 degree open air circulation helps even out the drying and also extends the drying time. This is though to help promote those clean crisp flavors and preserve the integrity of the coffee.


This is home. This is where the coffee starts and is born. I think of these places as being the same kind of home where the famous Louisville Slugger baseball bat is made. Baseball legend and lore in America can be tied to a lot of different towns but if I’m thinking about the place that is responsible for producing the very things that make baseball happen, it’s gotta be Louisville, KY.

For Team Haru, it must all go back to these people and their small plots of land where they grow their coffee and the mill where they take their coffee to be processed and cared for. The attention to detail here is critical and it’s what makes Haru such a special coffee. 

Keep a look out for the next post —

The Road To Boston, #Team Haru: Part 2!

Tuesday, February 5

  • 2 notes

Tuesday, January 1

Help me get to Santa Cruz to see Jackson Browne!

Ok, so I know this is a little silly but I really like Jackson Browne, tomorrow is my birthday (I’ll be 31), and a month from now Jackson Browne will be playing the 2nd night of his 2013 acoustic tour in Santa Cruz, CA at the Civic Auditorium. I can’t afford to fly myself out to California on my own so I thought I might lean on my friends and see if all of you might be able to help me out. If I don’t get at least 3/4 of my $700 goal, I’ll give you your money back (PayPal!).

You can send any dollar amount to my paypal account at
Jonathan.bonchak@gmail.com

I know there are other things that you could give your money to that would be of better use, but then again, maybe not. Afterall, there isn’t another songwriter like Jackson Browne. His music is important to all of us and I just think it’d be so great to see him live, acoustic, in Santa Cruz. Whatdya say, will you help me out? 

Thanks friends!

Tuesday, October 9

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Tuesday, September 25

  • 4 notes

Sunday, September 9

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grungebook:

Eddie Vedder joined Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band on “Atlantic City” at Chicago’s Wrigley Field Friday night.

(Source: cantwaitforviolence)

Tuesday, September 4

  • 2 notes

Thursday, August 23

Saturday, August 18

  • 3,343 notes
npr:

discoverynews:

It’s Friday night! Perhaps you have need of a bottle of wine for a nice evening out (or in)?  Don’t fret. We at the Discovery News tumblr page have found a way to help you pick. If it looks complicated, that’s because it is.
3wbutorin:

Infografica dedicata al vino


Good luck with this. — tanya b.

npr:

discoverynews:

It’s Friday night! Perhaps you have need of a bottle of wine for a nice evening out (or in)?  Don’t fret. We at the Discovery News tumblr page have found a way to help you pick. If it looks complicated, that’s because it is.

3wbutorin:

Infografica dedicata al vino

Good luck with this. — tanya b.

Friday, August 10

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slingshotcoffee:

In a blender add:

2 bananas, sliced and frozen
2 tablespoons peanut butter (we used Big Spoon Roasters)
1/2 cup Slingshot Cold Brew Summer seasonal (concentrate)
3/4 cup ice

Makes approx. 10 ounces.

So. Good.

@tipyourwaitress made this for me.this morning at it was delish! @bigspooners peanut pecan and @slingshotcoffee summer brew

slingshotcoffee:

In a blender add:

2 bananas, sliced and frozen
2 tablespoons peanut butter (we used Big Spoon Roasters)
1/2 cup Slingshot Cold Brew Summer seasonal (concentrate)
3/4 cup ice

Makes approx. 10 ounces.

So. Good.

@tipyourwaitress made this for me.this morning at it was delish! @bigspooners peanut pecan and @slingshotcoffee summer brew

  • 1 note

Thursday, August 9

  • 27 notes
beautifulcoffeesets:

Kermit

I don’t know if I could possibly love Kermit more now…

beautifulcoffeesets:

Kermit

I don’t know if I could possibly love Kermit more now…